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Archive for June 14th, 2008

In a recent Charlotte Observer article on UNC Charlotte’s Master Plan open forum for the community, one of the participants was quoted as saying,

“Students who are 18 to 21 years old really don’t make the best
neighbors,” said Richmond Baker of the Wyndham Place neighborhood.
“They are really disruptive to communities near school.”

I think this quotation exemplifies the attitude regarding UNC Charlotte’s growth among the community. Two years ago when I attended an open forum hosted by University City representative on Charlotte City Council, Mike Barnes, there were many angry residents complaining of various things but after 2 and a half hours no one mentioned UNC Charlotte once. Not even once. The reality of the situation is that UNC Charlotte was here 60 years ago and it will be here 60 years from now. If you don’t like the fact that students will live in and around a university then you need to move.

This university is completely irrelevant in the minds of the people that live within a 2 mile radius of it. It is a great school. It has a great educational environment along with world class facilities and faculty. Tons of accomplished alums are continuing successful careers and 5 of the Fortune 500 CFOs graduated from here. Why do people completely ignore it?

There is a stigma attached to UNC Charlotte’s abbreviation, UNCC. It sounds like a community college. Like CPCC. RCCC. GTCC. Also, and it frustrates members of the university administration to no end, but until we have football and we change our given name (a full name change is not necessary, just change the name we call ourselves) the community will continue to view us as irrelevant.

Light rail to campus in 5-6 years from uptown and a building in center city will help. The first truly urban university building in the state of NC will be quite an accomplishment. However, the citizens of Charlotte must have an emotional connection to the campus. Charlotte can’t own the school until they can focus on the campus instead of the “University of North Carolina” and citizens won’t love the school until they play football.

I wish it could be another way but to believe that it was would be denial.

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I’ve been wanting to take a picture of the Sears/ABC Store building ever since I first saw it last summer because I thought it exemplified the reality of mountain life better than about any other thing in Brevard.

Time after time I passed the building and never stopped to get a picture until Mandeep and Jessica were in town last weekend. They even offered to pose, exemplifying their true feelings about the odd building and its implications for drunkeness and appliance purchasing.

After submitting the shot to consumer advocacy and education blog the Consumerist and its Flickr Pool the shot got selected for their weekly Friday finds. The most hilarious part about the whole thing is reading the comments on ABC stores by Consumerist readers…


Oh North Carolina, why do you restrict liquor purchases to singular locations?

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Now that UNC Charlotte is considering the adoption of Google Apps, Information Technology Services stated they wanted to hear from some students on how we use email. To answer their call for a window into student technology use, I wrote up this quick essay which captured my thoughts on the topic:

E-mail was originally created as the next evolution of US Postal Service mail. It was designed to become the electronic equivalent to what we now affectionately term “snail mail” in the same way that voicemail was designed to replace the receptionist. E-mail has served this purpose for many years adequately. In the last 3-5 years with the advent of the internet as a social medium, more than just a technical and limited modicum of communication, the messages and interactions that take place through an email address (evolved past existing just as the abbreviation of “electronic mail”) have become the equivalent of asynchronous instant communications.

Students use synchronous message technology whenever the corresponding groups can communicate at predesignated or instantaneously convenient time, however the modern campus communication solution should embrace the intersection between synchronous and asynchronous communication.

This leaves the student email policy maker with a decision on choosing between two principles: embrace both time modes of communication and harness the collaborative power that current technologies allow or stick with the past definition of email as a mere replacement for paper.

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I’ve been wanting to take a picture of the Sears/ABC Store building ever since I first saw it last summer because I thought it exemplified the reality of mountain life better than about any other thing in Brevard.

Time after time I passed the building and never stopped to get a picture until Mandeep and Jessica were in town last weekend. They even offered to pose, exemplifying their true feelings about the odd building and its implications for drunkeness and appliance purchasing.

After submitting the shot to consumer advocacy and education blog the Consumerist and its Flickr Pool the shot got selected for their weekly Friday finds. The most hilarious part about the whole thing is reading the comments on ABC stores by Consumerist readers…


Oh North Carolina, why do you restrict liquor purchases to singular locations?

Read Full Post »