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Archive for January 4th, 2007

How To: Hustle A Drink

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Who would have thought that a band from Wilmington, NC would have so much political lyricism? From their most popular song, Condoleezza Check My Posse, The Majestic Twelve sing,

I think I’ll buy myself a home in San Diego

I’ll buy some Mexicans to clean it every day!

I’d buy Canadians, but they’re all friggin’ lazy

That’s where the hippies went when Dubya won the day

Oh oh oh oh, I will rule the world forever

I’m straight and white and male, American and free

Oh oh oh oh, Condoleezza check my posse

Clarence Thomas, Halliburton, mass destruction, me!

I’m sure that Europe is a lovely place to visit

My wife would love to go there every single year (sing!)

But they’re just puppies (yap yap yap yap yap yap yap yap yap)
They need to shut their yaps, the big dog’s over here

Oh oh oh oh, I will rule the world forever

I’m straight and white and male, American and free

Oh oh oh oh, Condoleezza check my posse

Bill O’Reilly, Diebold Systems, mass destruction, me!

Here we go!

I can’t believe I bought that land in California,

My stupid summer home just slid into the sea!

At least old Uncle Sam is going to rebuild it

My country loves to lend a hand to folks like me

Oh oh oh oh, I will rule the world forever

I’m straight and white and male, American and free

Oh oh oh oh, Condoleezza check my posse

Jerry Falwell, Coors Foundation, mass destruction, me!

Ann Coulter, Ann Coulter, Ann Coulter, Ann Coulter

Rush Limbaugh, Rush Limbaugh, Rush Limbaugh, Rush Limbaugh

Sean Hannity, Sean Hannity

Tucker Carlson, Tucker Carlson

Paul Wolfowitz, Paul Wolfowitz

Oh oh oh oh, I will rule the world forever

I’m straight and white and male, American and free

Oh oh oh oh, Condoleezza check my posse

Me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me!

The tune is rather catchy and the band is giving away their album for free! Check them out on their http://www.myspace.com/themajestictwelve

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Kim pointed out to me the other day that this year my birthday was on 7/7/07 and that I’d be 21…. a little bit of thought later led me to the astounding conclusion that the addition of all three numbers in my birthday gives me my age… 7+7+7 = 21. But that’s not all, here is some other crazy stuff involved,

My birthdate is 7/7/86 which 7+7+8+6 = 28 -> the average of all the numbers in the birthday is seven

Starting with the year 2000, I can add the numbers 7+7 and the last two digits of the year to get my age… so,

7/7/00 -> 7 + 7 -> 14 years old

7/7/07 ->  7 + 7 + 7 -> 21 years old

7/7/20 -> 7 + 7 + 20 -> 34 years old

Wow, that really makes it convenient for friends and relatives to know how old I am… this process can only work with people born on the following days in 1986

1/13
2/12
3/11
4/10
5/9
6/8
7/7
8/6
9/5
10/4
11/3
12/2

So that is only 12 days in 1986 that someone could have been born with this odd numerological oddity

https://i0.wp.com/www.lanuevacuba.com/graficas/numerology.gif

Go Numbers!

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I won’t go into any experience I may or may not have had with any type of polygraph but the National Science Association said this in a 2003 report,

The accuracy of the polygraph has been contested almost since the introduction of the device. In 2003, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) issued a report entitled “The Polygraph and Lie Detection”. The NAS found that the majority of polygraph research was of low quality. After culling through the numerous studies of the accuracy of polygraph detection the NAS identified 57 that had “sufficient scientific rigor”. These studies concluded that a polygraph
test regarding a specific incident can discern the truth at “a level
greater than chance, yet short of perfection”. The report also
concluded that this level of accuracy was probably overstated and the
levels of accuracy shown in these studies “are almost certainly higher
than actual polygraph accuracy of specific-incident testing in the field.” [1]

When polygraphs
are used as a screening tool (in national security matters and for law
enforcement agencies for example) the level of accuracy drops to such a
level that “Its accuracy in distinguishing actual or potential security
violators from innocent test takers is insufficient to justify reliance
on its use in employee security screening in federal agencies.” In
fact, the NAS extrapolated that 10,000 polygraph
tests searching for spies would incorrectly classify 99.5% of
“deceptive” results (those telling the truth yet incorrectly deemed to
be deceitful), and incorrectly classify 20% of deceitful subjects. The
NAS did conclude that the polygraph “…may have some utility” [2] and that there is “little basis for the expectation that a polygraph test could have extremely high accuracy.”[3]

The NAS conclusions were the same as those in the earlier United States Congress Office of Technology Assessment report “Scientific Validity of Polygraph Testing: A Research Review and Evaluation”.[4]

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